KHJ Thirty - May 12, 1971

Issue #306 - Former Jimi Hendrix drummer Buddy Miles has the highest debut this week with “Wholesale Love.”

KHJ Thirty No. 306 - Jerry Butler   KHJ Thirty No. 306 - May 12, 1971

5 comments:

steve elders said...

The presence of "Rainy Days and Mondays" reminds me that during this time, KHJ did some custom promos that were dropped into the intros of certain records and were designed to sound like an actual part of the record. One was for "RDAM." I can't remember the words used, but it was sung by a woman in the Karen Carpenter style and would play over the instrumental intro. The line may have been something like "Just turn us on, we'll never let you down," referring to the station. KHJ also did this over the intro of "Here Comes That Rainy Day Feelin' Again," sounding like the Fortunes. There were others, but I can't recall which records they were used in. Anyone else remember these custom promos?

Michael Hagerty said...

Those were actually jingles called "Pop-Tops" (I believe from PAMS Productions, a major jingle house of the time).

As far as which songs, they did tons...I've heard them for "Brown Sugar", "Indian Reservation", "The Drum" and a bunch more from early-mid 1971.

Paul Duca said...

Go to www.rockradioscrapbook.ca--they have a whole collection of Pop-Tops

steve elders said...

It would seem this trend was at its zenith in 1971 then. After this spurt, I have no memory of KHJ doing this again.

By the way, Pop Tops is a perfect description of these.

KG Dave said...

KHJ also did a Pop-Top for “Never Can Say Goodbye.” And Pop-Tops made a comeback in 1979, centered around two songs: “Fire” by the Pointer Sisters and “Living It Up” by Bell & James. At least four local radio stations did these 1979 Pop-Tops: KHJ, KFI, KRTH, and KTNQ. What I had found amusing as a teenager in 1971, I found irritating as a twenty-something in 1979.